Top 10 books on running

Yep. A list. The smarter amongst you may notice that I haven’t got to 10 yet – I’d welcome your ideas for inclusion!

1.  Running Through the Wall: Personal Encounters with the Ultramarathon by Neal Jamison (Paperback – April 2003)  A superb collection of essays and stories on ultra running.  Ranging from national champions to those at the back of the pack.  Now reading it for the fourth time.

2.  Lore of Running by Tim Noakes (Paperback – 1 Dec 2002)  The bible.  If Carling wrote books on running…. Can be a bit too scientific in places, but that is a very minor grumble.

3. Ultramarathon Man by Dean Karnazes (Paperback – 27 Feb 2006).  Probably the best known book on ultra running.  Love him or hate him, the book is good.

4. Advanced Marathoning by Peter Pfitzinger and Scott Douglas (Paperback – 1 Feb 2009)  In my view the best “template training programmes” for marathon training.  Scientific and well thought out.  Good stuff and well worth a read if you fancy the “shorter” stuff!

5. What I Talk About When I Talk About Running by Haruki Murakami and Philip Gabriel (Hardcover – 7 Aug 2008).  If you like Haruki Marakami, and you like running, then you’ll love this.  I was slightly underwhelmed.  “Your mileage may vary”.

6. Galloway’s Book on Running by Jeff Galloway (Paperback – May 2002) Whether you subscribe to “Gallo-walking” or not, this book has some very very good information in it.  If you run longer ultras, you will walk at some point anyway…  

The next 4 are up to you…..

Latest suggestion is this:

The Perfect Mile by Neal Bascomb (Paperback – 4 April 2005)

 

and how could I have forgotten this………..!!!!!!!!!

Once a Runner by John L., Jr. Parker (Hardcover – 7 April 2009)

Many people say that this is the best book ever written about running.  It is certainly extremely entertaining and pulls many real running heroes into the fictional plot.  However, as a piece of literature it is weak and poorly written.  I still love it though.

 

Had a request for this to be included, not read it myself:

Feet in the Clouds: A Story of Fell Running and Obsession by Richard Askwith (Paperback – 5 April 2005)

 

 

 

 

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6 Responses to “Top 10 books on running”

  1. Mark Says:

    I’ve heard really good things about “Born to Run”. Nice list – I especially enjoyed “The Perfect Mile” and “Running through the Wall”.

  2. toofat Says:

    If you haven’t please read Running & Being by Dr. Goerge Sheehan. I’ve read all of the books on the list except Once a Runner, which I am into now. While it is not a quote on quote training guide its the best book on running I’ve ever encountered.

  3. Carl Albright Says:

    Nice blog and list. The five of these that I’ve read have been excellent sources of information and inspiration.

    It looks like there’s still room for at least one more, so I’d consider adding this one:
    To the Edge: A Man, Death Valley, and the Mystery of Endurance, by Kirk Johnson

    I’d read it before watching Running on the Sun.

    • Tom Says:

      Hi Carl,

      Good shout. I have been meaning to find this – and to watch Running on the Sun. Thanks for the reminder.

  4. Carl Albright Says:

    Nice blog and good list; the five of these I’ve read have been excellent sources of information and inspiration.

    It looks like there’s still at least one open spot, so I think you should consider adding this one:
    To the Edge: A Man, Death Valley, and the Mystery of Endurance, by Kirk Johnson

    I’d read it before watching Running on the Sun.

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